Tag Archives: Mobile News

Fall Creators, the new Windows 10 upgrade

Fluent Design is finally arriving to Windows 10

Earlier this year, Microsoft unveiled its Fluent Design System, a new design language for the Windows 10 interface, announcing at the same time a number of changes to the company’s software in the future. This week, the Redmond company has finally rolled out the first phase of the new system, as part of the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update.

The launch has been accompanied by a video showcasing some of the new design changes to Windows 10, although it doesn’t reveal much information about any of the future additions. The video offers a sneak peek of various components and apps that have been redesigned with new visual effects that aim to give Windows 10 more texture, depth and visual responsiveness to inputs. The new Fluent Design will roll out gradually, starting with its own apps and elements like the Start menu, Action Center and notifications. Microsoft has stated that these are just the first steps of the project and that new features and capabilities will be introduced in the future.

Fluent Design System is designed to be the successor to Microsoft’s Metro design and will appear across apps and services on Windows, iOS and Android. Microsoft is focusing on light, depth, motion and scale, with animations that add a sense of fluidity during interactions, in contrast to the minimalistic, tile-based interface of the past. Besides incorporating the first phase of Fluent Design System, Windows 10 Fall Creators Update also introduces OneDrive Files On-Demand, a new feature that allows users to access their documents without having to download them. Microsoft Edge has also been improved, incorporating a new tool to manage Favorites and the ability to import settings from Chrome. Finally, the operating system includes a new GPU monitoring option in the Task Manager.

More new features yet to come

We’re expecting to see even more changes in the next Windows 10 update, which is currently in development under the codename Redstone 4. Microsoft has started testing the initial features for this version, which is scheduled for March 2018. The main addition so far is a new Cortana Collections feature, which will see and remember users’ browsing habits. As Microsoft finishes its functionality tests, new information will be unveiled about the new improvements, in addition to a new Timeline feature that will let users resume sessions and apps on Windows PCs, iOS and Android devices more easily.

This update does not affect the operation of the Windows 10-compatible antivirus solutions available on the market, including the entire Panda Antivirus product line. So, installing a professional antivirus tool is not only possible, but highly recommended. In this context, the latest version of Panda’s antivirus solutions has the added guarantee of having achieved one of the best detection rates in the latest edition of the AV-Comparatives professional antivirus comparative review.

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KRACK attack: beware of public Wi-Fi

Why can KRACK be so dangerous?

Cybersecurity experts have discovered a critical weakness in Wi-Fi connections that could make your private information vulnerable to cyber criminals. The threat is called KRACK (key reinstallation attacks) and could allow someone to steal information sent over your private Wi-Fi or any open connections you might access in public places like coffee shops.

KRACK is dangerous because it affects so many people. Most people who connect wirelessly to the internet through Wi-Fi on their phone, tablet, laptop, etc. do so using the WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access) protocol that helps keep your information safe by encrypting it—making it a secret code. Only now, KRACK has made it much less protected because thieves may be able to decypher the code that protects your information, and read it whenever they want.

Cyber criminals can also use KRACK to modify wirelessly transmitted data to and from the websites you visit. You might think you’re going to your bank’s website, when in reality you’re at a fake phishing site made to look like it. You unknowingly enter your username and password, and the thieves now can record that information.

How do I protect myself?

Update your operating system

Update your OS ASAP. In the meantime, Apple, Google and others are presumably working to roll out a patch to protect against KRACK.

Microsoft just announced it included a patch in an October 10th security update. For Windows customers who have their “Windows Update enabled and applied the security updates,” they’re automatically protected from the KRACK threat, according to Windows Central.

However, don’t assume you’re protected. Even if you’re a Windows user, double check you have the latest security updates.

Use Wi-Fi networks only when necessary

Until you’ve installed the security KRACK patch, avoid using Wi-Fi connections, both at home and especially public hotspots. Your home Wi-Fi connection is slightly more secure only because cyber thieves need to be relatively close to your physical location to steal your data. But that doesn’t mean you’re safe at home or in public.

If you absolutely need to use a wireless network, make sure you’re not transmitting confidential info like your SSN, credit card number, or bank information.

If possible, hardwire your wirelessly connected devices back to your modem/router. Cyber criminals can’t steal signals out of the air if they’re not there, so find that yellow ethernet cable you stashed somewhere in a drawer and use it to connect to as many devices as possible.

Update your wireless router’s firmware

Your router’s firmware helps it work correctly with your devices, so keep it up-to-date. When the security patch rolls out, you don’t want any issues with conflicting or unsupported firmware versions. Updating your router’s firmware is a relatively painless process.

Configure your router so only your approved devices can connect to the network. Each of your devices has a media access control (MAC) address that uniquely identifies it to work with the network. Configure your router to only allow listed devices. The process may differ depending on your router brand.

Hide your Wi-Fi network so even those close enough to detect your signal won’t see it listed. Hiding your network won’t stop dedicated hackers from eventually finding it, but it will create another step they must go through, which is your goal until the patch comes through. It’s likely it will take developers some time to adequately address KRACK, so stay vigilant.

Avoid unencrypted websites

Encrypted websites contain an HTTPS at the beginning of their URL’s. The information you send and receive to them is secure. Websites that only use the HTTP are NOT encrypted. So use HTTPS sites as much as possible. HTTPS Everywhere is a browser plugin that automatically switches thousands of sites from HTTP to HTTPS.

Get some good cybersecurity software

Having cybersecurity software always helps mitigate risk. For critical attacks like KRACK, it’s especially important to add as many layers of protection as possible.

What information can be stolen?

Anything you can send wirelessly over the internet. So, pretty much everything. Passwords, credit card numbers, voice messages, pictures, texts, and the like. Again, this goes for both public and private wireless networks, so your info could be stolen while you’re signed in to the library’s Wi-Fi network or when you’re texting someone from your living room. Deactivate your cell phone’s Wi-Fi connection until you’ve gotten the fix from your OS developer or stay on 3G network for data transfer.

Can it affect my devices?

Strictly speaking, no. Neither your wirelessly connected devices nor your router are being directly targeted. Unlike ransomware, thieves aren’t KRACKing into your device and threatening to destroy your information. It’s more of an elaborate heist job than a hostage situation. They want to decrypt the protocol, to eavesdrop on what your devices are saying. They’re interested in the info not who is talking. More importantly, thieves want to go unnoticed.

How did the KRACK vulnerability happen?

Your cell phone and Wi-Fi device (i.e. modem) need to “talk” to each other decide on how to work together transmit data. The language they use is called a protocol, or system of rules. The protocol is encrypted for privacy. It’s like if two people switched to a different language to discuss something privately. If you don’t know the language, you’re in the dark. That’s how your information is kept private when sent over Wi-Fi.

But the KRACK attack gives cyber criminals an opening to decrypt the information sent. It would be like someone bringing an interpreter to the couple’s private discussion. They now can overhear everything that’s being said.

Can I tell if someone’s stealing my info over Wi-Fi?

As of yet, there’s no way to know if someone is KRACKing your wireless access. That’s why it’s especially important to keep an eye out for an update, and to follow the safety recommendations above.

 

 

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Hackers demand nude images instead of money

We thought that we’d seen everything but hackers managed to hit a new low. Last month the news about a new ransomware that demands nude photos instead of the usual cryptocurrency started circulating the online world. The new ransomware is called nRansomware and works very similar to Locky – it is a malicious software that infects your device and locks some of the files on your system. Luckily the new threat is not a state of the art malicious software. While Locky encrypts your data, nRansomeware is known only to lock your screen. It is unfortunate enough but not absolutely devastating.

Up until now, when a PC was infected with ransomware, the cybercriminals behind it were after immediate monetary gain. However, hacker’s shady techniques are continually evolving. Online troublemakers are starting to realize that Bitcoin and most of the virtual cryptocurrencies are not as secure and untraceable as they initially thought. Payments can easily be tracked, so they decided to get creative by releasing ransomware that demands ten nude photos from the victims to “unlock” their computer.

The new ransomware feels like a yet another episode of the modern-day nightmares described in the hit TV series Black Mirror. When infected, your computer displays the text below instead of your desktop. The ruthless message from the hackers is placed on a background containing offensive language and multiple images of Thomas the Tank Engine.

Your computer has been locked. You can only unlock it with the special unlock code. Go to protonmail.com and create an account. Send an email to 1_****_yourself_1@protonmail.com. We will respond immediately. After we reply, you must send at least ten nude pictures of you. After that, we will have the verify that the nudes belong to you. Once you are verified, we will give you your unlock code and sell your nudes on the deep web.

It does sound gross, doesn’t it? The last thing you want is perverts bidding over imagery of your naked body. Hackers have been stealing intimate images from celebrities for a long time. Sadly, now they are starting to realize that they can make a buck by extorting regular people too. You no longer have to be rich or famous to attract hackers’ attention.

Is it a prank or a sign of the new way hackers will be making money out of the innocent? The time will show. One is for sure, cryptocurrencies are not untraceable, and cyber bullies with twisted minds exist out there. They are not afraid to pray on the weak by continuously finding new ways to avoid being caught. The chances of becoming a victim of such ransomware are rare to impossible if you are protected and follow our tips for staying out of trouble.

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DNA virus brings malware full circle

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In what sounds like a science fiction story, scientists have successfully infected a computer using a virus encoded in DNA. The experiment was designed to prove that DNA could be used to successfully infect computers in the future.

During the test, engineers created an artificial strand of DNA and “programmed” malicious code inside it. The strand was then inserted into a computer capable of reading the DNA code, and the malware successfully installed itself before going on to fully infect the machine.

A fledgling industry

Storing computer data in DNA is still a very experimental technique. Microsoft has been investing millions of dollars in the technology because they believe DNA can store much more information than traditional hard drives. Early tests have been quite successful as scientists have managed to store and retrieve poems, pictures and other files using the organic material.

We are still many years away from seeing commercial DNA storage however – it still costs hundreds of thousands of dollars to create synthetic strands of the material.

Because the best security safeguards are designed alongside new technologies, it makes sense for scientists to test DNA malware capabilities now. That way they can engineer systems to block malware before they become publicly available.

A headline grabbing experiment

A closer look at the DNA virus experiment shows that the problem of organic malware may not be as bad as expected (yet). The infected DNA was passed directly into the “reader” of its computer victim, which then read the instructions and executed the malware code – exactly as you might expect.

To put this into perspective, the process was no different to inserting an infected USB drive into your laptop, or executing an infected attachment in your email. Despite the unusual storage medium – DNA – there was nothing strange about the actual infection mechanism itself.

If you put a virus into an unprotected computer, you can expect the machine to be infected.

Replicating an ancient, natural phenomenon

Ironically infection by DNA is a truly ancient phenomenon. For thousands of years humans have been infected by the DNA carried by viruses, causing illnesses including the common cold.

During a human infection, the virus attaches itself to cells in the body, injecting infected DNA into them. This process is repeated in healthy cells over and over again, triggering the symptoms of the illness. Serious viral infections, like HIV or Hepatitis, can be fatal.

It is this natural process that gave computer viruses their name in the first place.

Prevention not cure is the answer

Viral infections in the human body cannot be cured with medication like antibiotics. Instead the body’s natural defences, the immune system, must fight the infection. For some serious infections anti-retroviral medications may be prescribed, with varying degrees of success.

The best way to prevent the spread of the virus is to avoid contact with it in the first place. When it comes to computers, that means installing antivirus software which can detect and block potential infections before they are installed. Even computers with DNA-reading capabilities.

To learn more about protecting your computer from viruses, download a free trial of Panda Security now.

The post DNA virus brings malware full circle appeared first on Panda Security Mediacenter.

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DNA virus brings malware full circle

pandasecurity-malware-dna

In what sounds like a science fiction story, scientists have successfully infected a computer using a virus encoded in DNA. The experiment was designed to prove that DNA could be used to successfully infect computers in the future.

During the test, engineers created an artificial strand of DNA and “programmed” malicious code inside it. The strand was then inserted into a computer capable of reading the DNA code, and the malware successfully installed itself before going on to fully infect the machine.

A fledgling industry

Storing computer data in DNA is still a very experimental technique. Microsoft has been investing millions of dollars in the technology because they believe DNA can store much more information than traditional hard drives. Early tests have been quite successful as scientists have managed to store and retrieve poems, pictures and other files using the organic material.

We are still many years away from seeing commercial DNA storage however – it still costs hundreds of thousands of dollars to create synthetic strands of the material.

Because the best security safeguards are designed alongside new technologies, it makes sense for scientists to test DNA malware capabilities now. That way they can engineer systems to block malware before they become publicly available.

A headline grabbing experiment

A closer look at the DNA virus experiment shows that the problem of organic malware may not be as bad as expected (yet). The infected DNA was passed directly into the “reader” of its computer victim, which then read the instructions and executed the malware code – exactly as you might expect.

To put this into perspective, the process was no different to inserting an infected USB drive into your laptop, or executing an infected attachment in your email. Despite the unusual storage medium – DNA – there was nothing strange about the actual infection mechanism itself.

If you put a virus into an unprotected computer, you can expect the machine to be infected.

Replicating an ancient, natural phenomenon

Ironically infection by DNA is a truly ancient phenomenon. For thousands of years humans have been infected by the DNA carried by viruses, causing illnesses including the common cold.

During a human infection, the virus attaches itself to cells in the body, injecting infected DNA into them. This process is repeated in healthy cells over and over again, triggering the symptoms of the illness. Serious viral infections, like HIV or Hepatitis, can be fatal.

It is this natural process that gave computer viruses their name in the first place.

Prevention not cure is the answer

Viral infections in the human body cannot be cured with medication like antibiotics. Instead the body’s natural defences, the immune system, must fight the infection. For some serious infections anti-retroviral medications may be prescribed, with varying degrees of success.

The best way to prevent the spread of the virus is to avoid contact with it in the first place. When it comes to computers, that means installing antivirus software which can detect and block potential infections before they are installed. Even computers with DNA-reading capabilities.

To learn more about protecting your computer from viruses, download a free trial of Panda Security now.

The post DNA virus brings malware full circle appeared first on Panda Security Mediacenter.

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Bionic employees and biohacking

pandasecurity-biohacking

Wireless chips are an increasingly important part of day-to-day life. We use contactless cards to pay for goods, they have replaced travel tickets, and many people even use embedded chips to access their offices at work.

But almost every chip required another plastic card – pretty soon you end up with a wallet full of contactless cards. Which is why some individuals have taken an extreme approach that allows them to do away with the cards altogether.

Embedding embedded chips

The chip inside a contactless card which provides all the clever intelligent functionality is actually extremely small. In fact, it is probably no larger than a grain of rice – which means that most of the plastic card it is embedded in is just wasted space.

As a result, some people are choosing to have the chips surgically implanted in their skin. The process is very similar to the microchipping technique used to help identify lost pets.

Once implanted, you can never leave home without your contactless card again. It also means that you can tell your friends you’re a bionic human!

Gaining acceptance

What was once a niche hobby for hardware hackers and geeks is now gaining more widespread acceptance. One American firm – Three Square Market – is even offering these wireless bionic implants to employees, replacing traditional door access cards and cash payments in the office canteen.

Other businesses are already looking at ways to take these implants to the next level. More than simply replacing existing electronics systems, they are looking at ways to enhance our biological capabilities. Some hope that one day humans will be able to navigate in the dark using echolocation like a bat, or to see colours in the normally-invisible infra-red spectrum for instance.

Obviously, there are ethical questions about these kinds of projects, but there are also concerns about security. If people are worried about AI being hacked and destroying the world, should they not have the same fears about bionic humans who meld biology and wireless technology?

There are already some serious issues to consider

The reason that existing implants work so well is because they simply replicate existing systems. Embedding your bank card’s chip under the skin allows you to tap-and-pay in-store for instance. But in the same way that someone can “skim” your contactless card to steal cash, criminals could also scan the card under your skin without your permission. People with embedded chips will need to pay extra attention to where they put their hands if they want to avoid being scammed!

On the plus side, current embedded chips are not designed to perform serious computing activities. Hackers may be able to read the chip contents without permission, but they cannot (yet) upload viruses or other malware to them. And because these chips are not connected to the human nervous system, they cannot be used to take over someone’s body.

As bionic chips improve, bionic hacking will undoubtedly become a real issue. Fortunately, technology has not yet brought us to that point. Which is great news for early adopters of implanted chips.

The post Bionic employees and biohacking appeared first on Panda Security Mediacenter.

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Bionic employees and biohacking

pandasecurity-biohacking

Wireless chips are an increasingly important part of day-to-day life. We use contactless cards to pay for goods, they have replaced travel tickets, and many people even use embedded chips to access their offices at work.

But almost every chip required another plastic card – pretty soon you end up with a wallet full of contactless cards. Which is why some individuals have taken an extreme approach that allows them to do away with the cards altogether.

Embedding embedded chips

The chip inside a contactless card which provides all the clever intelligent functionality is actually extremely small. In fact, it is probably no larger than a grain of rice – which means that most of the plastic card it is embedded in is just wasted space.

As a result, some people are choosing to have the chips surgically implanted in their skin. The process is very similar to the microchipping technique used to help identify lost pets.

Once implanted, you can never leave home without your contactless card again. It also means that you can tell your friends you’re a bionic human!

Gaining acceptance

What was once a niche hobby for hardware hackers and geeks is now gaining more widespread acceptance. One American firm – Three Square Market – is even offering these wireless bionic implants to employees, replacing traditional door access cards and cash payments in the office canteen.

Other businesses are already looking at ways to take these implants to the next level. More than simply replacing existing electronics systems, they are looking at ways to enhance our biological capabilities. Some hope that one day humans will be able to navigate in the dark using echolocation like a bat, or to see colours in the normally-invisible infra-red spectrum for instance.

Obviously, there are ethical questions about these kinds of projects, but there are also concerns about security. If people are worried about AI being hacked and destroying the world, should they not have the same fears about bionic humans who meld biology and wireless technology?

There are already some serious issues to consider

The reason that existing implants work so well is because they simply replicate existing systems. Embedding your bank card’s chip under the skin allows you to tap-and-pay in-store for instance. But in the same way that someone can “skim” your contactless card to steal cash, criminals could also scan the card under your skin without your permission. People with embedded chips will need to pay extra attention to where they put their hands if they want to avoid being scammed!

On the plus side, current embedded chips are not designed to perform serious computing activities. Hackers may be able to read the chip contents without permission, but they cannot (yet) upload viruses or other malware to them. And because these chips are not connected to the human nervous system, they cannot be used to take over someone’s body.

As bionic chips improve, bionic hacking will undoubtedly become a real issue. Fortunately, technology has not yet brought us to that point. Which is great news for early adopters of implanted chips.

The post Bionic employees and biohacking appeared first on Panda Security Mediacenter.

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Locky ransomware strikes at Amazon

pandasecurity-locky-amazon

Locky is back!

We’ve been closely monitoring the rebirth of the ransomware for quite some time. Since early last year, different variations of the ransomware have been periodically popping in and out. Last year we discussed the tricks of the malicious software and had a deeper look into how it works. As you may remember, the primary purpose of the malicious software is to make it to your computer. Once it gets there, it encrypts all certain files on your system and threatens you to delete them unless you pay a ransom. Payment in digital cryptocurrency is usually required by the cybercriminals to get back control of your files.

Amazon Marketplace

Multiple outlets such as ZDNet and Silicon Angle reported that a new version of Locky has been spreading around in a massive phishing attack. Cybercriminals have been sending roughly 1 million phishing emails per hour since Tuesday, and they are still going. Most of the attacks are disguised as fake Amazon Marketplace and Herbalife invoices spam emails, and phony printer orders, containing a zip file able to infect your computer with malicious software. The malicious emails have been targeted at businesses from all over the world. The main affected areas are US, Japan, Germany, and China.

How it works

Some of the infected users report that once Locky makes its way in, it builds the path for another type of ransomware called FakeGlobe. This means that if you fall a victim of one of Locky’s versions, you may potentially have to deal a second ransom. This is a new technique, but we shouldn’t be surprised as the recent phishing scams are getting more and more sophisticated. For example, the criminal minds behind the attack have been scheduling the emails to reach potential victims during working hours hoping to trick them into thinking it is a legitimate email.

Who’s behind Locky

No one yet knows who is behind Locky yet. ZDNet reported Locky makes its way via the Necurs botnet – an army of more than five million infected devices often used by cybercriminals for other shady activities such as executing email stock scams. However, most of the attacks are known to come from India, Greece, Vietnam, Colombia, Turkey, and Iran.

The fact that Locky in all its versions keeps coming back means that some people and businesses still fall for it.

Here are a few suggestions on how to prevent becoming a victim.

Install antivirus software – make sure those infected emails don’t even make it to you or your employee’s inboxes. And if they managed to go in through your spam filter, proper antivirus software would prevent you from opening the attachment able to infect your computer.

Do the updates – those updates are there for a reason. Very often malicious software exploits security holes in your operating system, don’t be shy and encourage your IT department always to make sure your systems are fully up-to-date.

Be smart – spend some time educating your employees about the harm that security breaches bring to your customers and your employees themselves. Roughly 60% of small businesses who suffer a hacker attack go out of business within six months. No one wants to lose his job! Also, remember not open suspicions emails!

Backup your files – make sure that you run a backup of your files at least once a week. This is how you will know that even if you or your business gets affected, you won’t have to pay the ransom but it may be a good excuse for a reinstall of your OS and full format of your drives.

The post Locky ransomware strikes at Amazon appeared first on Panda Security Mediacenter.

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Locky ransomware strikes at Amazon

pandasecurity-locky-amazon

Locky is back!

We’ve been closely monitoring the rebirth of the ransomware for quite some time. Since early last year, different variations of the ransomware have been periodically popping in and out. Last year we discussed the tricks of the malicious software and had a deeper look into how it works. As you may remember, the primary purpose of the malicious software is to make it to your computer. Once it gets there, it encrypts all certain files on your system and threatens you to delete them unless you pay a ransom. Payment in digital cryptocurrency is usually required by the cybercriminals to get back control of your files.

Amazon Marketplace

Multiple outlets such as ZDNet and Silicon Angle reported that a new version of Locky has been spreading around in a massive phishing attack. Cybercriminals have been sending roughly 1 million phishing emails per hour since Tuesday, and they are still going. Most of the attacks are disguised as fake Amazon Marketplace and Herbalife invoices spam emails, and phony printer orders, containing a zip file able to infect your computer with malicious software. The malicious emails have been targeted at businesses from all over the world. The main affected areas are US, Japan, Germany, and China.

How it works

Some of the infected users report that once Locky makes its way in, it builds the path for another type of ransomware called FakeGlobe. This means that if you fall a victim of one of Locky’s versions, you may potentially have to deal a second ransom. This is a new technique, but we shouldn’t be surprised as the recent phishing scams are getting more and more sophisticated. For example, the criminal minds behind the attack have been scheduling the emails to reach potential victims during working hours hoping to trick them into thinking it is a legitimate email.

Who’s behind Locky

No one yet knows who is behind Locky yet. ZDNet reported Locky makes its way via the Necurs botnet – an army of more than five million infected devices often used by cybercriminals for other shady activities such as executing email stock scams. However, most of the attacks are known to come from India, Greece, Vietnam, Colombia, Turkey, and Iran.

The fact that Locky in all its versions keeps coming back means that some people and businesses still fall for it.

Here are a few suggestions on how to prevent becoming a victim.

Install antivirus software – make sure those infected emails don’t even make it to you or your employee’s inboxes. And if they managed to go in through your spam filter, proper antivirus software would prevent you from opening the attachment able to infect your computer.

Do the updates – those updates are there for a reason. Very often malicious software exploits security holes in your operating system, don’t be shy and encourage your IT department always to make sure your systems are fully up-to-date.

Be smart – spend some time educating your employees about the harm that security breaches bring to your customers and your employees themselves. Roughly 60% of small businesses who suffer a hacker attack go out of business within six months. No one wants to lose his job! Also, remember not open suspicions emails!

Backup your files – make sure that you run a backup of your files at least once a week. This is how you will know that even if you or your business gets affected, you won’t have to pay the ransom but it may be a good excuse for a reinstall of your OS and full format of your drives.

The post Locky ransomware strikes at Amazon appeared first on Panda Security Mediacenter.

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Artificial Intelligence: Myth and Reality

pandasecurity-artificial-intelligence-myths

As Artificial Intelligence (AI) begins to find practical applications in day-to-day life, we are hearing more and more about it. In amongst the success stories are countless warnings of a Terminator-like future where self-aware robots take over the world.

So how can you separate fact from fiction, and could humanity really be eradicated by intelligent computers?

Computers will be more intelligent than people within the next 50 years – MYTH

Computer scientists are still divided over whether artificial intelligence will ever outperform humans. Computers are capable of storing and analysing huge amounts of data – much more than people – but they lack the intuition that makes us human.

Whether AI becomes more intelligent, or is able to appear more intelligent than us, remains unclear. Without the ability to display and read emotions, AI will never have the complete skillset that defines human intelligence.

Artificial Intelligence will destroy humanity – MYTH

Many philosophers ask the question, ‘What happens if machines achieve self-awareness?’ If AI can think for itself, could it act for itself? And what would it do to protect itself?

These questions formed the basis for The Terminator, and the movie has been scaring ordinary people ever since. Could AI wipe out humanity if it felt threatened?

The answer is…probably not. Artificial Intelligence systems run according to pre-defined parameters, helping to ensure they stay on track, solving the problems for which they were invented. Unless someone makes a mistake creating these parameters, the system is unlikely to develop “evil” tendencies.

AI can control people – FACT

We tend to think that only other humans can control us because we interact with them in the real world. But the reality is that our thoughts, feelings and emotions are manipulated by machines all the time.

Many of the adverts we see online are already designed and targeted using AI. Take Amazon for instance – they keep a record of every product you ever search for. AI then uses that information to arrange for you to see adverts for those products on other websites you visit. Known as “retargeting”, by continually showing us the same product AI begins to influence our interests – and many people do end up making a purchase.

As AI develops, these techniques will become more effective. AI may not completely “control” us, but it can certainly motivate us to act in specific ways.

AI is hack-proof – MYTH

Just because AI demonstrates intelligence, it is still little more than a complex computer program. Which means that it can be hacked.

Sophisticated cybercriminals could change the parameters used to control the AI system, allowing it to develop in unexpected ways – such as gaining Terminator-style self-awareness. More likely, AI will be directed to perpetuating other criminal activities, like bank fraud.

The future of AI isn’t really scary at all

As AI develops, systems may get better at identifying cyberattacks and protecting themselves. But for the foreseeable future, AI will need the same protections as your notebook computer – a decent anti-malware application, protected by a firewall to monitor network connections and block malicious activity.

Although you probably don’t have much dealing with AI in your house, there’s no reason to leave your computers unprotected. Download a free trial of Panda Protection and keep hackers away from your personal data.

The post Artificial Intelligence: Myth and Reality appeared first on Panda Security Mediacenter.

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